Chicago Zoological Society

For a Better World: Young Conservationists Making a Difference 

                   
 

                         
 

    

  
  
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December 2010
Posted: 12/27/2010 5:07:45 PM by Deb Kutska
Participants from the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum's TEENS program have had a busy fall engaging their peers and their communities in conservation!  Check out some of their hard work below!

  
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TEENS participated in the 10/10/10 Global Work Party: A Day to Celebrate Climate Solutions, by working at the Joy Garden at Northside College Prep High School.

  
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TEENS assisted the Nature Museum’s Educator Open House in October and helped educators around Chicago overcome their fear of cockroaches
 
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TEENS took part in a day of restoration at the Skokie Lagoons by cutting invasive Buckthorn

 
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TEENS lend a hand with the Herpetological Society on the first snowy day of December at the Nature Museum
 
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Posted: 12/14/2010 11:56:44 AM by Deb Kutska
 
Different macroinvertebrates, small creatures or “bugs” without a backbone, have different tolerances to pollution found in water. Pollution in this sense might include, phosphates and nitrates from fertilizer, bacteria, and some heavy metals. Several of these “bugs” are collectively known as Group 1 organisms. All of them happen to be insects, and all have no tolerance to pollution.
 
Friends of the Chicago River has been monitoring the health of the North Branch of the Chicago River for over fifteen years. In all that time, we’ve never found a Group 1 insect north of downtown. Until recently…
 
In October 2009, students from St. Ignatius College Prep High School and Maine East High School each found a dobsonfly larvae, also known as a hellgrammite. One was at Glenview Woods, the other at Linne Woods. Both were found in the North Branch of the Chicago River.
 
Allen LaPointe, Director of Water Systems and Analysis at the John G. Shedd Aquarium, is encouraged by this discovery. “Dobsonflies are an important piece of the puzzle in the Chicago River, along with bigger animals that eat them, like fish and otters. The return of these animals not present 20 years ago says to me that the river is improving.”
 
Ben Schaufele, a senior and Ecology Club member from Maine East High School, found the dobsonfly on his field trip. Upon learning of the insect’s importance as an indicator of good water quality and of the rarity of his find, Ben stated, “It was a privilege and an honor to find such an interesting indicator species.”
 
There are almost two dozen species found in North America, but none in the Chicago River until there were found in 2009. Since then, three additional dobsonfly larvae have been found on Friends of the Chicago River field trips. One by Maine East High School again at Linne Woods in October 2010. Two others were found in November 2010 by Christ the King School at Irene Hernandez Family Picnic Area in LaBagh Woods, a site downstream of last year’s discoveries. The larvae appear to be active in the late fall months.
 
Whether this is a return of the species for good or not is yet to be seen. Only continued monitoring of the river will tell.
 
Post submitted by Mark Hauser, Friends of the Chicago River
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About "Young Conservationists"

This blog was created to showcase youth who are making a difference in their communities and in conservation. Check back often to learn about individuals who are going above and beyond to positively impact their world, to learn about programs that are doing the same and to find valuable resources for youth in your community. Comments are encouraged and welcome! If you are interested in submitting content to post on the blurb or would like your organization to appear in our list of partners, please contact the blog moderator at: yvc@czs.org.



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